Derrick Hall satisfied with Dbacks buying and se

first_img Derrick Hall satisfied with D-backs’ buying and selling The 5: Takeaways from the Coyotes’ introduction of Alex Meruelo Last season, the Arizona Cardinals spent Dec. 24 in Seattle taking on the Seahawks.The Cardinals won that game, and in the process created a nice Christmas memory.In 2017, it looks like they’ll get a chance to make winning on Christmas eve a new tradition, as reports are saying they will host the New York Giants this Dec. 24. New York Giants quarterback Eli Manning (10) looks to pass as Arizona Cardinals defensive end Calais Campbell (93) rushes the passer during the first half of an NFL football game Sunday, Sept. 14, 2014, in East Rutherford, N.J. (AP Photo/Bill Kostroun) Comments   Share   Former Cardinals kicker Phil Dawson retirescenter_img Top Stories Francesa just announced the #Giants 2017 schedule on air. Here’s what it is, if he’s correct: pic.twitter.com/XJAEHUAXMj— Tom Hanslin (@tomhanslin) April 20, 2017The Cardinals will be facing the Giants for the first time since 2014, when they played each other at MetLife Stadium in New Jersey, and will be hosting them for the first time since 2011. While no one will know for sure what kind of game this year’s matchup will be, it does at least for now shape up as a pivotal NFC battle between a Giants team that earned a Wild Card bid in 2016 and the Cardinals, who missed the playoffs in 2016 after reaching the NFC Championship Game the prior season.Historically, the Cardinals are just 43-81-2 against the Giants, with many of their games occurring when each team held residence in the NFC East. But since 2002, when the Cardinals moved to the NFC West, the Cardinals have a 4-3 edge in the series. Grace expects Greinke trade to have emotional impactlast_img read more

Study Heavily traumatized people may not necessarily develop PTSD symptoms

first_img Source:https://www.birmingham.ac.uk/news/latest/traumatised-refugees-may-not-develop-ptsd.aspx Reviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Sep 3 2018Heavily traumatized people such as refugees fleeing war, torture and natural catastrophes may not necessarily develop posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), a new study reveals.Researchers worked with a group of refugees – half suffering from PTSD, the others not – and asked them to suppress neutral memories. Results showed that participants who struggled to control these thoughts were more likely to show symptoms of PTSD.The research raises the question of whether the ability to control memories protects against developing PTSD or if the condition causes an impairment in an individual’s ability to control their memories?Experts at the University of Birmingham, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, the University of Konstanz and Berlin’s Max Planck Institute for Human Development worked with 24 refugees from a range of European, African and Asian countries to complete the study, which is published in Scientific Reports.They found that the more severe the PTSD symptoms, the more difficult refugees found suppressing neutral memories. Their study also indicated that efforts to forget the memories caused problems in remembering non-traumatic experiences.The research indicates that PTSD patient’s problems in suppressing traumatic memories relates to dysfunctional gamma frequency activity in the brain – a discovery that could help to shape more effective treatments.Dr Simon Hanslmayr, Reader in Cognitive Neuroscience at the University of Birmingham, commented: “Difficulties experienced by people with severe PTSD symptoms when attempting to suppress bad memories is linked to the ability to regulate gamma frequency brain activity.Related StoriesRepurposing a heart drug could increase survival rate of children with ependymomaOxidative stress could play key role in the spreading of aberrant proteins in Parkinson’s diseaseNew therapy shows promise in preventing brain damage after traumatic brain injury”This novel biomarker could help identify risks posed to PTSD patients by memory suppression techniques and assist in adapting and developing psychotherapeutic methods. Our study certainly raises concerns about unwary use of memory suppression in treating PTSD sufferers.”The researchers note that more research is needed into the effects of traumatic stress in refugees. This would help to develop effective medical strategies to deal with the immediate health and socioeconomic challenges posed by high numbers of refugees.Dr Gerd Waldhauser, from the Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience at Ruhr University Bochum, commented: “Refugees and asylum seekers are often excluded from medical treatment or do not seek help. They are often unable or unwilling to take part in demanding cognitive neuroscience studies, making data such as ours precious in understanding a rarely-studied population with abundant mental health problems.”PTSD is a disorder characterized by the recurrent and uncontrollable intrusion of traumatic memories. Patients tend to try to suppress these intrusions which can aggravate the condition’s symptoms and cause further emotional distress.Researchers worked with a group of 24 refugees, who took part in a series of tests whilst being observed with magnetoencephalography (MEG) brain imaging technology which registered the different frequencies of brain activity they exhibited.last_img read more