Now, a tigress is lynched near Pilibhit Tiger Reserve, probe ordered

first_imgEven as the country looks for the likely release of the much-awaited tiger census on July 29, Global Tiger Day, an adult tigress was lynched on July 24 by villagers living in proximity to the Pilibhit Tiger Reserve in the Terai region of Uttar Pradesh, officials said on July 26.While the locals said the tigress attacked them when they were working in the fields, the forest department said the incident followed a youth trespassing into the animal’s “natural habitat” despite warnings to avoid contact.The assault on the tigress was also captured taken as a video in a mobile phone by a local of Matena village in Puranpur tehsil. He even provides a background commentary to justify the attack. He says it is retaliation for the tigress’ earlier attack on the youth.A total of nine persons were injured by the tigress in the entire episode, locals claimed, but Vaibhav Srivastava, District Magistrate, Pilibhit, said the figure appeared suspicious prima facie as the animal would not usually attack so many people at one go.The incident took place on Wednesday when one Guddu “suddenly went near the tigress without any reason,” following which the panic-stricken animal attacked him, said Naveen Khandelwal, Divisional Forest Officer, Pilibhit Tiger Reserve.The tigress was living safely in her “natural habitat” in Ghungchai compartment number 12 of the core zone of the tiger reserve, he said.When the youth raised a cry, villagers rushed to save him. Around 43 persons entered the jungle with lathis and ‘sujas’ (spears) and assaulted the tigress, leaving it seriously injured, said Mr. Khandelwal.Died “due to shock”The tigress died of its injuries on the intervening night of July 24 and 25. A post-mortem conducted by a three-member team of experts concluded that the tigress died “due to shock” as a result of blood haemorrhage, broken bones and numerous injuries with sharp and blunt objects.Villager Chandresh said the tigress attacked while they were in the field…in a populated area.” He accused the first officials of negligence and delay in reaching the spot of conflict.Another local told journalists that while working in the field a boy went to the edge of the field to defecate and that’s when the tiger attacked him. The other people working in the field rushed to rescue him but the tiger attacked them as well, he said.In the mobile phone clip of the beating of the tigress, dozens of locals can be seen wielding long sticks and mercilessly thrashing the animal, which lay on the ground helpless on its back and rolled about in pain.On one occasion, the tigress rolled back on to its belly, triggering panic among the villagers who retreated. However, the animal was too injured to strike back or chase them.The person who shot the video is heard complaining that no forest official had reached the spot to mitigate the situation.‘Forest officials attacked’Mr. Khandelwal, however, said the locals also attacked the forest officials monitoring the tigress and created obstacles in their work. Forest inspector Dinesh Giri and his team of security watchers tried to stop the attack on the tigress but had to escape from the spot after the villagers launched a “deadly attack” on them, said Mr. Khandelwal in his report.Mr. Srivastava said the animal could not be tranquillized as doing so would have led to its death given the injuries sustained by it.Legal action was being taken against the villagers who killed the tigress and an FIR had been lodged against several persons, said Mr. Srivastava.A magisterial probe has also been ordered to investigate the entire sequence of events.Around 98 cases of conflicts between humans and tigers, leading to human deaths and injuries have been recorded between 2000 to 2018 in and around the Dudhwa-Pilibhit Tiger landscape, as per the Wildlife Trust of India (WTI), a leading nature conservation organisation that works with the State Wildlife Department.Since 2009, the WTI project team has rescued eight tigers from 36 human-tiger conflict situations, with four tigers successfully released back into the wild.Conflict casesA total of 136 humans have been attacked by tigers or leopards in 94 fringe villages of Dudhwa-Pilibhit forests in 151 reported conflict cases from 2000 to 2013, as per a 2018 report, ‘Living with the Wild—Mitigating Conflict between Humans and Big Cat Species in Uttar Pradesh,’ jointly undertaken by the WTI and the Forest Department.According to the report, attacks by tigers and leopards on humans and livestock marked a seasonal and geographical variation, with most attacks occurring during the day time, suggesting “that the larger proportion of tiger attacks on humans were accidental encounters.”Tiger attacks occurred largely inside forests or on their fringes (54.79%), while (31.5%) occurred in crop fields, primarily sugarcane. Only a small proportion of attacks (13.7%) were recorded to have occurred within houses or near homes.Tiger attacks were found to be higher in winter (42.5%), with the peak in February (19.2%), “which probably corresponds to a high influx of people collecting fuel-wood in forest areas,” followed by summers (39.7%).However, when it came to attacking livestock, the highest number of incidents involving leopards and tigers were reported during monsoons: 45-50%. Though full data is not available, official records from 2003 to 2012 reveal 474 livestock deaths across the Dudhwa-Pilibhit Tiger Reserve landscape, with tigers accounting for 58.6% of the deaths.The high number of attacks on livestock during monsoons “is in contrast to the seasonal patterns of attacks on humans by the two big cat species, and demands more detailed study to determine the underlying causality,” the WTI noted.Attacks by tigers were higher when people visited forests to collect firewood and other non-timber products (38.6%). A high percentage of tiger attacks (32.9%) also occurred when people worked in farms, and about 23.3% when people sat, moved, defecated or urinated in the village periphery or fringe forests.last_img read more

Hand splint- series

first_imgIndicationsTo begin making a hand dressing, place the injured hand around a cloth ball or other malleable (cushioned or padded) object, such as a tennis ball, balled-up sock, or rolled-up elastic bandage.Indications, part 1Use a cloth or rolled bandage to apply a circumferential wrap. Do not forget to place padding between the fingers.Indications, part 2Use adhesive tape or a cloth strip to anchor the bandage and separate the fingers, as shown above.AftercareThe complete wrap leaves the fingertips exposed, so that they can be checked for adequate circulation.Review Date:4/16/2013Reviewed By:C. Benjamin Ma, MD, Assistant Professor, Chief, Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, UCSF Department of Orthopaedic Surgery. Also reviewed by A.D.A.M. Health Solutions, Ebix, Inc., Editorial Team: David Zieve, MD, MHA, Bethanne Black, Stephanie Slon, and Nissi Wang.last_img read more

Gov’t to Review Tertiary Education Funding

first_img Prime Minister the Most Hon. Andrew Holness, says the Government will be undertaking a review of tertiary education funding. Prime Minister the Most Hon. Andrew Holness, says the Government will be undertaking a review of tertiary education funding.He said the objective is to ensure that more students will have access to higher learning.“A part of the transformation in the way in which we fund tertiary education is to fund the students rather than the institutions. I think if you do that, you will see institutions becoming more efficient, because they now have to compete for the students and I think, that, in itself, will make tertiary education more accessible and more affordable,” he said.The Prime Minister was speaking at the Northern Caribbean University’s (NCU) fundraising banquet held on Thursday (June 15) at The Jamaica Pegasus hotel in New Kingston.Mr. Holness said the new funding arrangement will include careful negotiations and public discourse.He said while the Government does not have the resources to make tertiary education free, there are ways to restructure student loans and the resources being provided so that more students are able to complete their courses.“Every year, the number of students who register but then are unable to complete their courses is increasing, and it amounts almost to a waste because, you start, you pay down then can’t finish, you drop out, and that money is gone,” he lamented.He said the Government has heard the concerns regarding funding and is moving to make improvements.“We know the difficulties that students face, which is why we have been very sympathetic and acted to support students who reached out to us at the University of the West Indies (UWI), to ensure that they could stay in school and complete their education. They are far more valuable to the society with a degree than without,” the Prime Minister pointed out.The banquet was to commemorate the inauguration of the NCU’s 24th President, Dr. Lincoln P. Edwards.During the function, awards were presented to several persons for institutional advancement.They include Dr. and Mrs. Ethelred Carter; Mr. Victor Dixon (posthumously) and Bernice Dixon; Drs. Neville and Angela Gallimore; the Hon. Michael Lee-Chin; Dr. and Mrs. Milton Morris; the Most Hon. Percival James Patterson; Dr. and Mrs. Witford Reid; Dr. and Mrs. Herman Ricketts; Dr. and Mrs. Byron Robinson; Mr. and Mrs. Aston Tai; Dr. Herbert Thompson; Dr. Ouida Westney; and Dr. Lennox Westney (posthumously). “A part of the transformation in the way in which we fund tertiary education is to fund the students rather than the institutions. I think if you do that, you will see institutions becoming more efficient, because they now have to compete for the students and I think, that, in itself, will make tertiary education more accessible and more affordable,” PM Holness said. PM Holness said the objective is to ensure that more students will have access to higher learning. Story Highlightslast_img read more

China to Conduct YearLong Ship Pollution Control in Hainan

first_imgzoom China has launched a year-long inspection campaign on Ship Pollution Control in the Hainan Province as part of its efforts to reduce air and water pollution associated with shipping, marine insurer Gard said.The Chinese Maritime Safety Authority (MSA) said it would conduct an inspection campaign at ports of Yangpu, Haikou, Sanya and Basuo as well as the Qiongzhou strait between November 3, 2017 and December 3, 2018. The inspections are to focus on compliance with MARPOL Annex VI on air emissions as well as the ballast water management (BWM) convention, Gard’s correspondent Huatai Insurance Agency & Consultant Service informed.To demonstrate compliance with MARPOL Annex VI, bunker delivery notes and engine room logbook records must be up to date and readily available for inspection by the attending port state control officer (PSCO). The sampling inspection will be carried out for the fuel sample taken from calling ship or the oil supplying company randomly.There are currently no designated emission control areas (ECAs) in the Hainan Province, that is the sulphur content of any fuel oil used on board ships shall not exceed the global 3.50% limit applicable until January 1, 2020. However, ships using separate fuel oils to comply with ECA regulations in other parts of the world should always be prepared to demonstrate how the fuel oil change-over is done and recorded.To demonstrate compliance with the BWM Convention, the BWM Certificate, BWM Plan and BW Record Book must be up to date and readily available for inspection by the attending PSCO. Inspections are likely to focus on ships’ equipment and procedures for disposal and discharge of ballast as well as the crews’ familiarity with the same.Owners are suggested to pay attention to the above requirement when calling the coastal ports of Hainan province as well as when passing through the Qiongzhou strait to ensure satisfaction of relevant requirement in order to avoid any delay or penalty to the ship.They are also recommended to double check with local agent on special requirement before ship’s calling during the one-year period.last_img read more