Trial in many anti-Sikh riots cases yet to be completed

first_imgThirty-four years after riots broke out in the Capital in the aftermath of assassination of the then Prime Minister Indira Gandhi, killing over 2,700 Sikhs, the trial in a number of cases is yet to see its logical conclusion.On Tuesday, the Delhi High Court convicted Congress leader Sajjan Kumar for killing five Sikhs in the Raj Nagar area during the anti-Sikh riots and sentenced him to imprisonment for the remainder of his natural life. However, this is not the only case Mr. Kumar is currently facing in connection with the 1984 riots. Recently, a witness had told a local court here that she saw him addressing the crowd in the Sultanpuri area that Sikhs had killed “our mother” and instigated the mob to kill them. The next date of the case hearing is December 20.Another Congress leader Jagdish Tytler too is facing trial at a local court here in connection with riots at Gurdwara Pulbangash in North Delhi where three people were killed. Mr. Tytler was thrice given a clean chit by the CBI in the case, but the agency was directed by the court to further investigate the matter after the victims filed a protest petition challenging the agency’s closure report in the case.In February 2015, the Centre constituted a Special Investigation Team (SIT) for re-investigating the serious criminal cases which were filed in Delhi in connection with the 1984 riots and have since been closed. A total of 293 cases were taken up for re-investigation.The three-member SIT is also probing Mr. Kumar’s alleged role in two other cases. One of them is the twin murders of a man and his son in west Delhi’s Punjabi Bagh. In November, a local court awarded death sentence to a man for the murder of two men in south Delhi’s Mahipalpur. This was one of the five cases in which the SIT had filed a charge-sheet.last_img read more

Gov’t to Review Tertiary Education Funding

first_img Prime Minister the Most Hon. Andrew Holness, says the Government will be undertaking a review of tertiary education funding. Prime Minister the Most Hon. Andrew Holness, says the Government will be undertaking a review of tertiary education funding.He said the objective is to ensure that more students will have access to higher learning.“A part of the transformation in the way in which we fund tertiary education is to fund the students rather than the institutions. I think if you do that, you will see institutions becoming more efficient, because they now have to compete for the students and I think, that, in itself, will make tertiary education more accessible and more affordable,” he said.The Prime Minister was speaking at the Northern Caribbean University’s (NCU) fundraising banquet held on Thursday (June 15) at The Jamaica Pegasus hotel in New Kingston.Mr. Holness said the new funding arrangement will include careful negotiations and public discourse.He said while the Government does not have the resources to make tertiary education free, there are ways to restructure student loans and the resources being provided so that more students are able to complete their courses.“Every year, the number of students who register but then are unable to complete their courses is increasing, and it amounts almost to a waste because, you start, you pay down then can’t finish, you drop out, and that money is gone,” he lamented.He said the Government has heard the concerns regarding funding and is moving to make improvements.“We know the difficulties that students face, which is why we have been very sympathetic and acted to support students who reached out to us at the University of the West Indies (UWI), to ensure that they could stay in school and complete their education. They are far more valuable to the society with a degree than without,” the Prime Minister pointed out.The banquet was to commemorate the inauguration of the NCU’s 24th President, Dr. Lincoln P. Edwards.During the function, awards were presented to several persons for institutional advancement.They include Dr. and Mrs. Ethelred Carter; Mr. Victor Dixon (posthumously) and Bernice Dixon; Drs. Neville and Angela Gallimore; the Hon. Michael Lee-Chin; Dr. and Mrs. Milton Morris; the Most Hon. Percival James Patterson; Dr. and Mrs. Witford Reid; Dr. and Mrs. Herman Ricketts; Dr. and Mrs. Byron Robinson; Mr. and Mrs. Aston Tai; Dr. Herbert Thompson; Dr. Ouida Westney; and Dr. Lennox Westney (posthumously). “A part of the transformation in the way in which we fund tertiary education is to fund the students rather than the institutions. I think if you do that, you will see institutions becoming more efficient, because they now have to compete for the students and I think, that, in itself, will make tertiary education more accessible and more affordable,” PM Holness said. PM Holness said the objective is to ensure that more students will have access to higher learning. Story Highlightslast_img read more

Rice expert Daniel Cohan available to discuss EPA ozone rules

first_imghttp://news.rice.edu/files/2015/09/Dan-Cohan-2012b-small.jpgDaniel Cohan (Credit: Rice University)Located on a 300-acre forested campus in Houston, Rice University is consistently ranked among the nation’s top 20 universities by U.S. News & World Report. Rice has highly respected schools of Architecture, Business, Continuing Studies, Engineering, Humanities, Music, Natural Sciences and Social Sciences and is home to the Baker Institute for Public Policy. With 3,888 undergraduates and 2,610 graduate students, Rice’s undergraduate student-to-faculty ratio is 6-to-1. Its residential college system builds close-knit communities and lifelong friendships, just one reason why Rice is ranked No. 1 for best quality of life and for lots of race/class interaction by the Princeton Review. Rice is also rated as a best value among private universities by Kiplinger’s Personal Finance. To read “What they’re saying about Rice,” go here. ShareEXPERT ALERTDavid Ruth713-348-6327david@rice.eduMike Williams713-348-6728mikewilliams@rice.eduRice expert Daniel Cohan available to discuss EPA ozone rules HOUSTON – (Sept. 28, 2015) – Daniel Cohan, an associate professor of civil and environmental engineering at Rice University, is available to discuss this week’s Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announcement of new limits on surface-level ozone pollution.The EPA is expected to restrict ozone levels to as little as 65 to 70 parts per billion (ppb). Ozone, a primary component of smog, is currently restricted to 75 parts per billion. Backers of the proposal said tighter restrictions will improve public health. Its opponents said the regulations will be prohibitively expensive for industries that will be forced to cut emissions and will harm the economy.The Obama administration is expected to issue the new rule by Thursday.“Ozone smog is a potent pollutant that damages crops, harms the lungs and can even cause deaths,” Cohan said. “Health-effects researchers have been finding that ozone can cause damage even at levels that met the older limits.“Given the substantial health effects of ozone, anything that reduces ozone levels in the air is an important win for health,” he said. “However, what remains to be seen is how the efforts to meet the standards on peak ozone days translate into affecting ozone levels at other times of the year, which are not regulated by these standards.”Cohan said ozone control efforts have been in limbo for several years as states await a new standard. By finalizing a new standard, he said, the EPA will help provide states with the clarity they need to develop attainment plans.“Cities such as Houston and Dallas that already violated the 75-ppb standard will need even greater emission reductions to meet the new standards,” Cohan said. “Meanwhile, the tighter new limits will push many other regions into nonattainment for the first time, even as their air is getting cleaner.“Much of the improvement needed to meet the new standards is already on the way as older cars and trucks are replaced by newer, cleaner ones. However, some cities will need dramatic additional emission reductions to meet the new standards. In some regions, background and transported levels of pollution may make it very difficult for the standards to be met.”Cohan specializes in the development of photochemical models and their application to air-quality management, energy policy and health-impact studies. He is a recipient of a National Science Foundation CAREER young investigator award and a member of the NASA Air Quality Applied Sciences Team.For more information or to schedule an interview with Cohan, contact Mike Williams, senior media relations specialist at Rice, at mikewilliams@rice.edu or 713-348-6728.Rice University has a VideoLink ReadyCam TV interview studio. ReadyCam is capable of transmitting broadcast-quality standard-definition and high-definition video directly to all news media organizations around the world 24/7.-30-Follow Rice News and Media Relations via Twitter @RiceUNewsRelated Materials:Cohan Research Group: https://cohan.rice.eduEPA Integrated Science Assessment for Ozone: http://www2.epa.gov/isa/integrated-science-assessment-isa-ozoneGround-level ozone falling faster than model predicted: http://news.rice.edu/2013/03/11/ground-level-ozone-falling-faster-than-model-predicted-2/Image for download: AddThislast_img read more